The Daily Recruiter

The Ezine for Executive Managers … brought to you by The SearchLogix Group.

Category: Making a New Start (Page 1 of 16)

Pain Plus Reflection Equals Progress

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Article Found on:  www.fs.blog

Our most painful moments are also our most important. Rather than run from pain, we need to identify it, accept it, and learn how to use it to better ourselves.

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Our images of learning are filled with positive thoughts about how we learn from others. We read memoirs from the titans of industry, read op-ed pieces from thought leaders, and generally try to soak up as much as we can. With all this attention placed on learning and improving and knowing, it might surprise you that we’re missing one of the most obvious sources of learning: ourselves.

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Accentuate the Positive!

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Article Written By:  Julie Winkle Giulioni @ smartbrief.com

Today’s managers shoulder the significant responsibility of delivering individual and organizational performance, and doing so in a fast-changing environment.

For many, accomplishing this mission involves sophisticated monitoring systems that provide real-time data about how results are tracking against goals, with a focus typically upon when the mark is being missed. Many leaders have become masters at minding the gap, evaluating the delta and assessing the shortfall. They then develop improvement plans, take corrective action and offer constructive feedback to those involved. Sound familiar?

In most organizations, considerable energy and attention are invested in what’s off track as opposed to what’s working well. Perhaps it’s time to turn this upside down and heed the advice of the old 1940s song “Accentuate the Positive”:

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Stop Hating The People You Serve

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Article Written By:  Dan @ LeadershipFreakBlog
May 8, 2018
Leaders get frustrated with the people they serve. You hear them grumble, “What’s wrong with people?” It happens in the business world, education, church world, and governments as well.

“Dissatisfaction – apart from loving action – eventually morphs into hate.”

10 symptoms of hateful leadership:

Minimizing or ignoring your impact on others.
Peevishness that won’t let go of small issues, faults, or offenses.
Withholding help when you’re able to make work easier for others.
Criticism that points to wrong without working to make something right.
Complaining that camps in the past.

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Few Do-Overs in Leadership, Instead, Do-Different

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Article Written by:   Art Petty; www.artpetty.com

In a perfect world, we would all start our roles as managers and emerging leaders fully aware of the behaviors and ingredients that promote success. In reality, the work of leading is learned through clumsy practice and (hopefully) refined over time. I for one would love a do-over for my ego-driven, “my way or the highway” early days as a manager. Unfortunately, there are no do-overs in leadership, just opportunities to do-different. For anyone striving to climb

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How to Make Your Speaking Voice Sound More Intelligent

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Article Written by:  Dr. Nick Morgan, PublicWords.com

You’re standing in the wings, getting ready to go on stage to give an important speech. If you’re like most people, you’re just a little nervous at this point. Well, OK, maybe more than a little nervous. Maybe you’re terrified. And maybe you’re asking yourself, how do I sound more intelligent, confident, dominant, and attractive than I really am in order to succeed with this audience?

Fortunately for you, Susan M. Hughes, from the Department of Psychology at Albright College, has carried out a neat little research study to help you do exactly that.

The results are more nuanced and surprising than you might expect.

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Here Are 5 Ways To Negotiate An Apology

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Article Written by:  Tanya Tarr, Forbes

What’s a key resource in any business? Relationships. Experts point to the value of strong relationships in developing success and leadership at work and in the world. But what if we accidentally jeopardize those relationships? We all make mistakes. Maybe it’s a botched meeting or a tragically double-booked day. Maybe you forgot about a conference call and logged on (accidentally) 15 minutes late. You didn’t calculate time zones correctly, or you just spaced out at your desk. Whatever the case may be, we have all been there. While concrete steps should be taken to avoid future mistakes, the way we recover and apologize can mean the difference between making a career limiting move or repairing and possibly strengthen work relationships.

This all comes down to the art of apology. While you might not consider an apology to be a negotiation, it absolutely is one. While I’ve written about the power of having a strong walkaway plan, there are times when executing your walkaway plan aren’t feasible. It also might be the case that walking away would be more damaging than negotiating the space where the disagreement lives.

Where a negotiation based on price involves a zone of possible agreements, negotiating an apology involves a zone of possible concerns. Respect and trust are the values being transacted. Taking the time to surface the concerns of your negotiating partner (or the person you missed the meeting with) is part of defining that zone of possible concerns. The other part of defining your zone of possible concerns is determining what actions will re-establish trust and strategically communicate respect. Let’s look at five ways to do this:

1. Be sincere, direct and clear in your communication. Principled negotiators often mention the importance of clear and direct communication. That might look like briefly stating the honest reason why something might have gotten fumbled and offer a short, sincere apology. I’m not talking about over-apologizing, which can be a hazard for some. This would be a situation where it’s clear you had direct fault in a negative outcome. The key here is to speak very plainly, own fault where appropriate, and pivot quickly to a solution. That solution might be a discussion on how you can make the situation right or how you will take steps to make sure it doesn’t happen again in the future.

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Stop Making New Goals—Create Habits Instead

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Written by:  Marcia Reynolds, Psy.D; www.psychologytoday.com

Finally become the person you want to be.

The scenario: You declare a change you want to make to achieve the results you desire. You eagerly set a goal and plan the steps. You tell yourself this time, you will commit to your goal.

Then you go back to days full of urgent emails and texts; projects falling behind; messes to clean up; fires to put out; agendas, lists and people who need to be heard out.

You think about your goal between frantic interruptions, but the days feel so overwhelming and out-of-control, you cling to what you have done in the past. You say, “Next week I’ll change when I have more time.” Lapses of distraction and masterful rationalizations crush your best-laid plans.

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5 Ways to Lead Change in a Change-Averse Environment

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Written by:  Jon Lokhorst (https://leadchangegroup.com/5-ways-lead-change-change-averse-environment/)

Despite the constancy of change in today’s global marketplace, the environment for change in many organizations is unfriendly at best. Few organizations have the appetite for change found at Facebook, Google, Amazon, and other innovative firms. I work extensively with CPAs, CFOs, and other technical professionals; a group not known for its propensity to change.

As a leader, you recognize that when the pace of internal change lags the pace of change in the external environment . . . well, it’s not good news. But what do you do in a context that resists change? How can a leader initiate and navigate change in a change-averse industry or culture? Here are five approaches to overcome barriers to change in these situations.

Launch a “CEO for a Day” forum.
Host town meetings with workers from across all levels of your organization to ask what they would do differently if they were CEO for a day. Offer a structured brainstorming conversation that invites new ideas. Start with questions that generate ways to improve current practices. Then move to explore new opportunities.

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5 Tragic Losses Caused by ‘Someday Syndrome’

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‘Either get busy living or get busy dying.’

By:  RAY EDWARDS  (https://michaelhyatt.com/someday-syndrome/)

“You have Parkinson’s Disease,” said the doctor. It was September 22, 2011—the day before my 46th birthday. While not usually fatal, Parkinson’s is a degenerative disease. This means it inevitably worsens over time. There is no cure. I was suddenly facing the prospect of limited mobility as my future unfolded.

In the movie Shawshank Redemption, Andy Dufresne says to his pal Red as they sit in the prison yard, “It comes down to one simple decision. Either get busy living or get busy dying.” My life had taken an unexpected and unpleasant turn, but it was not over.

I decided to get busy living.

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5 Things Successful Entrepreneurs Do on the Weekends

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How are you spending your Saturdays and Sundays? Here’s how to make sure you’re not wasting them.

If you’re like most people, you probably want to spend your Saturday and Sunday sleeping in, only to roll out of bed and onto the couch to veg out in front of a little mindless TV—but just until it’s time to change out of your sweats and into real clothes for dinner and a fun night of drinking. Right? Yeah, that’s most people, but not entrepreneurs.

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